Category Archives: Latest News

Christmas Decorations Craft workshop not on this evening

A reminder that the Christmas Decorations Crafts workshop led by the Community Environmental Trust in Castle Vale (shown in our Activity Guide) is not on this evening (21st December 2017) as it was rescheduled to last week instead. We are very sorry for any inconvenience or disappointment caused.

If you’d like an alternative activity then how about decorating your garden with some fallen pine cones instead and give the birds a nice present this Christmas? You can find a ‘how to’ guide on the RSPB website here…

The Tame Valley Wetlands’ Team wish you a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Tameforce volunteers pulling ragwort from Castle Vale Meadow (Birmingham), © Tame Valley Wetlands, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

Tameforce volunteers donate over 7,000 hours since 2015

A team of dedicated volunteers have been improving the landscape of the Tame Valley Wetlands for wildlife and people, totalling 7,009 hours of volunteering since 2015.

“Tameforce” is a group of volunteers carrying out environmental conservation and countryside access work as part of the Tame Valley Wetlands Landscape Partnership Scheme. The group started in June 2015, with one volunteer, and 34 more have taken part since then. They have worked at 29 locations in the Tame Valley Wetlands area, from Southfields farm in Coleshill to Warwickshire Moor local nature reserve in Tamworth.

Tameforce volunteers installing a bench in Dosthill Park local nature reserve, © Tame Valley Wetlands, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

Tameforce volunteers installing a bench in Dosthill Park local nature reserve, © Tame Valley Wetlands, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

“The idea behind Tameforce was to support local groups, landowners and local authorities who want to improve the environment or encourage people to enjoy nature, but may not have the capacity to do so.” Rita Gries, Tame Valley Wetlands community and events officer said. “Our volunteers have truly exceeded our expectations. Over the last 2.5 years, they accomplished so much, surpassed all the targets we had set, and kept an upbeat and supportive attitude whatever the weather”

Angella Rodgers, member of Friends of the Lakes, a Tamworth-based community group said “We greatly appreciated the input from the Tameforce volunteers at Stoneydelph lakes. They helped us clear a huge area of invasive brambles, thin trees in the woodland and clear a pathway. The extra manpower meant we were able to complete substantial tasks, but it was also like having a training day. The volunteers were used to doing these tasks and competed them with confidence. We began to see that we also could make a real difference in our volunteering, and we like to think that we carried on the good work.”

Stoneydelph lakes before and after: Orchard at Kettle brook local nature reserve (near Stoneydelph lake) before and after Tameforce volunteers cleared brambles ©Angella Rodgers

Stoneydelph lakes before and after: Orchard at Kettle brook local nature reserve (near Stoneydelph lake) before and after Tameforce volunteers cleared brambles ©Angella Rodgers

For volunteers, Tameforce offers an opportunity to give something back to society, build up skills, keep fit and socialise. Vicky Jorden, a Tameforce volunteer, said: “I enjoy the sense of achievement at the end of the day, when I can see the difference we have made to an area, and enjoy working with a diverse, friendly and interesting team. I have learnt many new practical skills through my volunteering and gained confidence in my physical abilities”

Tameforce volunteers meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and are led by Tame Valley Wetlands staff. They take on many different tasks, such as building nest boxes, planting trees and wildflowers, removing invasive non-native rhododendron and Himalayan balsam, managing woodland and wetland and hedge laying. They have also worked hard to improve access  for all in the Tame Valley Wetlands: clearing vegetation from footpaths, replacing stiles with kissing gates, installing benches and improving way marking. They have helped create four new circular walks, and improved a total of 30km of footpath. Since 2015, Tameforce has also cleared litter off 42 acres of land, the equivalent of 28 football pitches.

Tameforce volunteers pulling ragwort from Castle Vale Meadow (Birmingham), © Tame Valley Wetlands, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

Tameforce volunteers pulling ragwort from Castle Vale Meadow (Birmingham), © Tame Valley Wetlands, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

This project is part of the Tame Valley Wetlands – a landscape partnership scheme supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund, aiming to create a wetland landscape, rich in wildlife and accessible to all. Those interested in joining Tameforce should email volunteering@tamevalleywetlands.co.uk. The circular walks are downloadable from www.tamevalleywetlands.co.uk

The Tame Valley Wetlands is led by Warwickshire Wildlife Trust in partnership with a wide variety of organisations including charities, local groups, statutory bodies and councils.

 

Kettle brook before and after laying woodchip: Path in Kettlebrook local nature reserve (Tamworth), before and after Tameforce volunteers laid woodchip, © Roy Chambers, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

Kettle brook before and after laying woodchip: Path in Kettlebrook local nature reserve (Tamworth), before and after Tameforce volunteers laid woodchip, © Roy Chambers, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

the bank of the River Tame arm at Tameside local nature reserve before and after Tameforce volunteers planted wildflowers © Tracey Doherty, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

the bank of the River Tame arm at Tameside local nature reserve before and after Tameforce volunteers planted wildflowers © Tracey Doherty, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

Tameforce volunteers planting a hedge in Castle Vale conservation area (Birmingham), © Tame Valley Wetlands, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

Tameforce volunteers planting a hedge in Castle Vale conservation area (Birmingham), © Tame Valley Wetlands, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

Tameforce volunteers laying a hedge at Kingsbury Water Park, © Tame Valley Wetlands, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

Tameforce volunteers laying a hedge at Kingsbury Water Park, © Tame Valley Wetlands, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

Tameforce volunteers putting in fencing at Kingsbury Water Park, © Ebony Chapman, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust

Tameforce volunteers putting in fencing at Kingsbury Water Park, © Ebony Chapman, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust

Bench installed by Tameforce volunteers in Dosthill Park local nature reserve, © Tame Valley Wetlands, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

Bench installed by Tameforce volunteers in Dosthill Park local nature reserve, © Tame Valley Wetlands, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust 2017

 

On your bikes! Pedal-powered Christmas cinema pops up in historic Hall

Don’t miss a unique opportunity to experience a Christmas classic -with an eco-friendly twist- on Saturday 9th December at Middleton Hall, Tamworth.

The Tame Valley Wetlands Landscape Partnership Scheme (LPS) are organising a screening of the well-loved holiday feature the Muppet Christmas Carol. This pop-up cinema will be powered by members of the public, who can jump on one of the six bicycles connected to the projector. The cinema will take place in Middleton Hall’s great hall, a historic Georgian building decorated for the occasion.

Rita Gries, Tame Valley Wetlands LPS community and events officer, said “We are really excited about this year’s Cycle Cinema. Middleton Hall, with its charming decorations, is the perfect setting for this timeless Christmas tale and the bike-powered projector adds a fun, educational twist. With only 70 tickets available, it’ll be an exclusive event, with a cosy atmosphere.”

The screening starts at 5.30pm and will last about two hours. Tickets are £3 for adults and £1 for under-18s and available online at the Tame Valley Wetlands website (www.tamevalleywetlands.co.uk/christmas-cycle-cinema)

This project is part of the Tame Valley Wetlands – a landscape partnership scheme supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund, aiming to create a wetland landscape, rich in wildlife and accessible to all.

The Tame Valley Wetlands is led by Warwickshire Wildlife Trust in partnership with a wide variety of organisations including charities, local groups, statutory bodies and councils.

Work on the willows continues at Borrowpit Lake

The Lamb Angling Club held a work party on Sunday, 19th November 2017 to continue the work on the willows which have become a ‘den of mischief’ in recent years.

Six members of the Club worked hard to remove and stack the brash so that our Partner, Tamworth Borough Council – Streetscene team could chip them. The site is really starting to open up and feel safer.  Again, there was three big bags of litter collected – glass beer bottles, plastic soft drinks bottles and cans mostly.  We are continuing to get lots of positive feedback from passers by, which is great motivation.

There’s still lots to do and it has the making of a great wetland area. Watch this space!

Here are some before and after photos taken on Sunday.

Start of the ‘big’ stream clean up at Borrowpit Lake

Today, we have been working on clearing the brook that links Borrowpit Lake to the River Anker.  Just two people worked hard to clear a 30m section of litter and encroaching instream vegetation.

The clean up produced 10 bags of litter, 6 traffic cones, 1 tyre, 1 snowboard and 1 full size punch bag.  We estimate between 150-175 glass and plastic bottles and cans were removed from this short section of stream in less than 3 hours.

  • 6 traffic cones, 1 tyre, 1 snowboard and 1 full size punching bag were the interesting finds of the day
  • 10 bags of litter containing no less than 150-175 bottles and cans collected in 3 hours
  • Many bottles and cans were submerged in the stream.
  • Over 20 bottles were found within a 2m square area beneath nettles on the stream bank
  • It may look like vegetation but it is hiding something....
  • We discovered a headwall into the stream, completed blocked and with bottles inside the pipework too!

We received lots of great comments from passers by who told us to “keep up the good work” or “you are doing a great job”.   This nice feedback is great motivation.

Thanks again to Tamworth Borough Council Streetscene team who came out to collect all the rubbish.

Take a look at the before and after photos.

 

 

 

Pathway improvements at Borrowpit Lake

Tame Valley Wetlands are extremely grateful for help by six volunteers from Keir Services (Area 9) who transformed a dark, enclosed pathway to be more open and accessible at Borrowpit Lake, Tamworth.

  • The guys start to remove the willow dome den that is a hub of anti social mischief. Removing this will help make the area safer.
  • The girls remove the blackthorn scrub encroachment, opening up the pathway and making it more accessible and feeling safer by improving the sight lines
  • Streetscene came out to chip all the vegetation which can be used as landscaping material in the Borough
  • The Environmental team from Keir Services who manage Area 9 for Highways England.

The environmental team worked hard all day to clear vegetation near Borrowpit Lake and the Snowdome to help define a pathway and create a safer space for walkers around the lakeside. Their hard work was immediately recognised by passers by who welcomed the work and said what a difference it made.

Partners in our Borrowpit Lake project, Tamworth Borough Council and The Lamb Angling Club came out to see the work and thank the group.

We are also extremely grateful for support from Tamworth Borough Council, whose Streetscene team chipped the arisings and removed three large bags of rubbish from the site.  The  wood chippings can be reused as landscaping material.

Take a look at some of the before and after photos.

 

 

Curdworth hedge receives heritage makeover

If you have driven along the Kingsbury Road through Curdworth village you may have noticed some work happening at the King George V Playing Fields.

We are working in partnership with Curdworth Parish Council to give the hedgerow alongside the playing field car park a heritage makeover with the ancient skill of hedge laying.

The work should be complete by the end of October 2017. This work is funded by Heritage Lottery Fund.

Here are some before and after photos.

Mini-beast hotels

Creating Mini-beast hotels from recycled pallets.

As part of the Tame Valley Wetlands Landscape Partnership Scheme, the Community Environmental Trust has enhanced an outdoor space at St. Gerards Primary School in Castle Vale, east Birmingham.

Simon Lowe, Tame Valley Wetlands’ Training and Education Officer together with Sarah Oulaghan, Project Officer Community Environmental Trust created a “ Mini-beast hotel “ in the grounds of the school. The hotel was constructed from recycled pallets which were kindly donated by BMW at Hams Hall and was filled with various bits of material, both natural and manmade, which were collected from the local area and also brought in from home by the children.

Ten children from the after-school eco club, came out and assisted with the construction of the hotel, with the idea being that it would provide an invaluable resource for future lessons involving insects, habitats and the environment, not to mention providing a home for an abundance of creatures ranging from insects, to amphibians and even hedgehogs.

The hotel has been in-situ for almost a year and the children are already using the hotel to learn about the different species which live in their school grounds and are already getting to grips with identifying what they find.

You can find out more about how you can help your local wildlife by visiting the Warwickshire Wildlife Trust website and clicking on the “ how to help wildlife “ page. Here you will find plenty of fun activities that you can do in your own garden.

warwickshirewildlifetrust  ▸

Quotes requested for the production of films

TVWLPS is seeking to commission a series of promotional films for its circular and long distance walks in the Tame Valley, a short documentary celebrating the work of the Heritage Lottery Funded project, and a short promotional film advertising the Tame Valley Wetlands’ landscape..

TVWLP is seeking to commission:

  • 10 x 90-second walks videos detailing the Tame Valley Wetlands’ package of circular walks (5 – 10 miles), and a 120-second video promoting the Tame Valley Wetlands’ longer distance route through the Tame Valley Wetlands scheme area, The Tame Way.
  • A short documentary film (3-5 mins) to celebrate the work of the Tame Valley Wetlands Landscape Partnership project, featuring interviews with staff, volunteers and scheme partners, along with representative shots of on going and competed projects, and the Tame Valley landscape.
  • A short promotional film advertising the Tame Valley Wetlands’ landscape – its assets, appeal and value for people and wildlife – for marketing and tourism purposes.

A Brief outlining the work required is available to download here

Download Brief…

Deadline

Consultants are invited to quote for the work outlined in the Brief by 10.00am, Monday 30th October 2017.

Contact

For more information, please contact Dafydd Jones.