Nature Spots 4.0

Windier and rainier weather this week might not have welcomed you outside, but there’s still so much nature to appreciate even when the sun isn’t shining! Thanks again for sending in your photographs.

This photo of a green veined white butterfly (Pieris napi) shows brilliant detail of the texture of the wings and the scales, which appear similar to hairs, covering the body. These butterflies usually prefer areas of damp and lush vegetation but can be found in a variety of habitats. Its food plants consist of members of the cabbage family and caterpillars of this species are bright green, camouflaging well on leaves.

Submitted by Stephen Powell, Whitacre Heath

This juniper shield bug (Cyphostethus tristriatus) was spotted on a Lawson’s cypress. Although traditionally they feed on juniper, these insects have adapted to be able to also use Lawson’s cypress, which has enabled them to extend their range across the UK.

Submitted by Debra Starkey

Wildflowers can be grown really easily in your garden and are a fantastic way to help insects and other wildlife in your local area. Here is a wonderful picture of some ‘cornfield weeds’ planted from a seed packet.

Submitted by Stephen Powell, Nether Whitacre

A walk through Whitacre Heath Nature Reserve was rewarded with an array of wildlife and this tawny owl feather found on the path. It took a while to identify it, looking very similar to a buzzard feather! The wildflowers, including ox-eye daisies, bird’s foot trefoil and thistles are welcomed habitats and food sources for insects and birds. The Wildlife Trusts have recently released their report ‘Reversing the Decline of Insects’, and maintaining an abundance of insect habitats is essential for contributing towards reversing their decline. You can read more and download a free guide explaining how you can help the ‘Action for Insects‘ initiative on the Wildlife Trusts website.