Wild Places

The Tame Valley Wetlands has a wide variety of habitats that host a rich diversity of wildlife and rare species.

This regionally important river corridor is home to some of the most important wildlife sites in the Midlands. It is also a vital north-south migration route, providing essential resting and feeding places for hundreds of migrating birds.

Click the titles below for more information:

Broad Meadow +

What to do & see:

Fritillaries on Broad MeadowThe 61-acre Broad Meadow is sited on the island between the two channels of the River Tame at Tamworth. It is an example of lowland meadow – a floodplain grassland habitat which is becoming increasingly rare in Staffordshire and across the UK. Broad Meadow is also one of only two sites in the county where the rare Snake’s Head Fritillary can be found growing wild.

Broad Meadow is a Local Nature Reserve and is managed under the Wild About Tamworth project, which aims to make the site more accessible to people by opening it up and more valuable to wildlife by allowing the fritillaries to spread.

Access:

From Oxbridge Way, via the bridge over the weir to the west of the site.

Contact:

www.tamworth.gov.uk

Egg Meadow +

What to do & see:

Situated in the centre of Tamworth. In spring, look out for the displays of snake’s head fritillary and the other wildflowers in the meadow. You can also enjoy the circular cycle route which runs around the outside of the site.

Access:

From the Snow Dome car park.

Contact:

www.tamworth.gov.uk

Borrowpit Lake +

What to do & see:

Enjoy a walk around the lake and see Tamworth’s famous swans and many other wetland birds.

Access:

From the Snow Dome car park.

Contact:

www.tamworth.gov.uk.

Tameside Local Nature Reserve (LNR) +

What to do & see:
Tameside Local Nature Reserve

With the River Tame to the east and the Coventry Canal to the south, take a circular walk around the reserve and watch lapwings, cormorants and terns on the islands. Dragonflies, frogs and grass snakes may also be spotted. The LNR is managed by Tameside Wildlife Conservation Group through the ‘Wild about Tamworth’ project, a joint initiative between Staffordshire Wildlife Trust and Tamworth Borough Council.

Access:

From Fazeley Road – no on-site parking available.

Contact:

www.tamworth.gov.uk

Dosthill Park and Local Nature Reserve (LNR) +

What to do & see:

Take a walk through the park and down to the River Tame. Here you will be rewarded with a wonderful view of the river and Dosthill Quarries beyond. The LNR is managed by Dosthill Park Wildlife Group through the ‘Wild about Tamworth’ project.

Access:

From Blackwood Road, 3km to the south of Tamworth town centre, between the A51 (Tamworth Road) and the River Tame.

Contact:

www.tamworth.gov.uk

Birmingham and Fazeley Canal +

What to do & see:

Birmingham Fazeley Canal
The canal provides an enjoyable walking, cycling or boating route between Tamworth and Curdworth (which then heads into the heart of Birmingham). Its route runs adjacent to the River Tame and marks the west side of the wetland sites within the Tame Valley. It also provides a linear habitat for creatures such as the water vole.

Access:

Towpaths open to the public – visit the website for more details.

Contact:

www.canalrivertrust.org.uk/

Middleton Lakes +

What to do & see:

RSPB Middleton LakesThis 160ha reserve was a gravel quarry until 2007. Situated adjacent to Middleton Hall (owned by Middleton Hall Trust with a craft centre and tea room) and between the River Tame and the Birmingham and Fazeley Canal, the site now contains lakes, pools, reedbeds, meadows and woodland and is a haven for wading and woodland birds, otters, dragonflies and butterflies. There are footpaths, viewpoints and an events programme.

Access:

Open to members of the public.

To find out more about access and opening times, as well as the events programme and volunteering, visit the website.

Contact:

www.rspb.org.uk/reserves

Kingsbury Water Park +

What to do & see:

Kingsbury-Village-and-River-Tame-c-EA250ha of country park comprising of 30 lakes, including fishing lakes, pools, streams, marshes, woodland, meadows and the River Tame, with way-marked trails, bike hire, bird hides and a visitor / education centre.

Access:

Visitor centre and main car park (pay on entry) on Bodymoor Heath Lane, Bodymoor Heath, B76 0DY. Toilet facilities (baby changing and disabled) are available. See the website for more information.

Contact:

www.warwickshire.gov.uk

Lea Marston Lakes +

What to do & see:

lea_marston_lakesThe lakes, covering 150Ha, are former settling lagoons, constructed from former gravel pits to help clean up the heavily polluted River Tame. They are of regional significance for winter wildfowl populations. There is a bird hide and walks around the lakes.

Access:

The car park entrance is on Coton Road, and gates to this car park are shut at 18:30 in winter and 20:30 in summer. Access on foot can be obtained at anytime.

Contact:

www.environment-agency.gov.uk

Whitacre Heath Nature Reserve (SSSI) +

What to do & see:

Whitacre Heath Nature ReserveThe 44ha former gravel working site is on the floodplain of the River Tame. The reserve has fairly flat informal paths (after an initial steep slope up from the car park) with a way-marked route to 5 bird hides. Paths are prone to flooding and are muddy in winter.

Access:

Open to members of the Trust only, with good car parking facilities on the Birmingham Road, 0.5km south-east of Lea Marston.

Contact:

www.wkwt.org.uk

Ladywalk Nature Reserve +

What to do & see:

Ladywalk nature reserveApprox. 50ha of wet grassland, reedbed and woodland with the River Tame meandering around 3 sides of the reserve. A range of pools and pasture create a habitat attractive to a wide variety of birdlife – over 200 species of birds have been recorded, including wintering Bittern.
Read more…

Access:

Open to members of West Midland Bird Club only, but there is a public bird hide which can be visited by contacting the club via the website.

Contact:

www.westmidlandbirdclub.org.uk

Shustoke Reservoir +

What to do & see:

Swans on Shustoke ReservoirThere are opportunities for bird watching, fishing and sailing, and in the spring, the banks of the reservoir are covered by wildflowers. There are a variety of walks including a circular walk around the reservoir. It also links to the Heart of England Way and Centenary Way. The North Warwickshire Cycle Way also links to the site.

Access:

Main car park can be accessed from the B4114, Coleshill – Nuneaton Road.

Contact:

www.stwater.co.uk/

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